Wright, George N

George Nathaniel Wright was born in 1915 to Charles and Blanche Wright who then lived in Laurel Springs, Maryland. George was one of five children. The family later moved to Elverson, Pennsylvania.

George became a bus driver for Immaculata College, and was a member of St. Agnes Church.

George married Mary Stanley. Mary was employed as a Hostess at the Manson House Hotel, a large hotel located at the corner of Market and Church streets.
Army Logo Shadow
George obtained employment as a driver for the Short Line Bus Company. George was known as “Nate” to his friends, and was popular among fellow workers, and held in high regard by his employers.

George was inducted into the Army in January, 1943, along with Hero Edward McCormick. George and Edward received basic training at Fort McClellan, Alabama, and then were sent to the Shenango Replacement Center in Greenville, Pennsylvania. George was sent overseas to Italy in June, assigned to the 1st Battalion, 168th Regiment, 34th “Red Bull” Division in General Mark Clark’s Fifth Army. 

Mary received a letter from George dated November 27th telling her that the battle was “tough going”. On December 22nd, Mary returned home from visiting a friend to receive the fateful telegram of her husband’s death. 

Private First Class George Nathaniel Wright died of wounds on December 4, 1943. George was buried at the Sicily-Rome American Cemetery in Nettuno, Italy, with full military honors. A memorial service, including celebration of High Mass, was held on December 28th at St. Agnes Church.

A Daily Local News story in the November 28, 1944 paper gives an account of George’s Battalion in this battle:

 The battalion is a unit of the 34th “Red Bull” Division of Lieut. Gen. Mark W. Clark’s Fifth Army, now in the Gothic Line in northern Italy.

For four days and nights from November 29, 1943 to December 3, the battalion, after storming and seizing the vital objection, clung tenaciously to its position despite ferocious Nazi attacks, severe casualties, bitter weather, rugged terrain and almost insuperable supply, communication and evacuation problems. 

German attempts to regain the objective were preceded by intense artillery and mortar barrages and climaxed by bitter fire fights and hand – to – hand engagements.  At times, due to the shortage of ammunition, the embattled Yank infantrymen threw stones and ration cans at the assaulting Nazis.

The battalion’s stand forced the Germans to abandon their winter line.”

For four days and nights from November 29, 1943 to December 3, the battalion, after storming and seizing the vital objection, clung tenaciously to its position despite ferocious Nazi attacks, severe casualties, bitter weather, rugged terrain and almost insuperable supply, communication and evacuation problems. 

German attempts to regain the objective were preceded by intense artillery and mortar barrages and climaxed by bitter fire fights and hand – to – hand engagements.  At times, due to the shortage of ammunition, the embattled Yank infantrymen threw stones and ration cans at the assaulting Nazis.

        The battalion’s stand forced the Germans to abandon their winter line.


Hero Edward McCormick was killed in action three days earlier in the same area.

Other Heroes fought and died in this area of Italy: Hero William Taylor of West Chester on May 16th, 1944, and Hero LeRoy Barnes of Downingtown, on September 19th 1944.

Credits

 
Research by Don Wambold, WCMSC