Talley, Morton L. Jr

Morton Lackey Talley Jr. was born in 1912  to Morton and Elizabeth Talley of West Chester, Pennsylvania. He was the oldest of three children. 

 Morton attended West Chester High School. The class yearbook says of him: 

 "Mort” or “Talley” as he is known by his friends is a great booster of our High School. Being athletically inclined he has helped dear old W. C.H. S. win many victories. “Mort” is also very good in the dramatic line, especially when he is taking part as a general.

 While attending school, Morton worked as a sales clerk at DeHaven’s Drug Store. He graduated in 1929. Afterwards, he obtained employment at the Downingtown Manufacturing Company.

Morton was a member of the West Chester Rifle and Pistol Club, and also a member of their crack 10 men Rifle Team. The Rifle team entered competitions using 22 caliber rifles. Morton was known as a crack shot.

Edwin Travis who was also on the rifle team, and remembers Morton as quiet and dignified; and one whom you could always rely on.

Morton married Elise Montgomery - they lived in West Chester.

Morton joined the Pennsylvania National Guard, Company I, 111th Infantry, and “West Chester Own” in 1930. The Company was activated for Active Military Duty in 1940. He trained at various camps in the states; he was stationed at Camp Pendleton, Virginia in October,1943 where he wrote his will. Morton advanced in rank from private to Commissioned Officer. He was promoted to First Lieutenant when the Company left West Chester in February, 1941. Morton was promoted to Captain later, then Major in February, 1942. He was home on furlough in August and October, 1943.

He was then shipped overseas to the Pacific Theater of Operations in December, 1943. His wife received a letter in July informing her he was in the Hawaiian Island area. He was later sent to the Florida Island in the Solomon Island group - just north of Guadalcanal, and where Hero George Johnson died on August 7, 1942.)

Major Morton Lackey Talley died non-battle in an aircraft crash on July 26, 1944 in the Solomon Islands. His wife, Elsie was alone with her son when she received the telegram from the War Department on August 8th. She carried the sad news to his parents on the farm.

Morton was buried in a local military cemetery with full honors. He was disinterred to be brought back for burial in his home country in 1948. Lieutenant Colonel Arthur J. Jennings of the US Army Quartermaster Center in Philadelphia, accompanied the body as guard of honor. Funeral services were held on March 3, 1948. A military service was conducted by representatives of Company I, the American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars and the Society of the 28th Division. Interment was at the Birmingham Cemetery. A guard of Honor lined the pathway for the flag draped coffin.  A salute was fired by a squad comprised of members of Company I under First Sergeant Henry A. Tukloff, a friend of Morton. Don Ivins Himes sounded Taps.

Morton was the first World War II casualty from Company I, and the first Army commissioned officer from West Chester to die in the war. 

Credits

 
Research by Don Wambold, WCMSC
talley
Morton graduated in 1929 and then obtained employment at the Downingtown Manufacturing Company.

Morton joined the West Chester Rifle and Pistol Club and became a member of their crack 10 men Rifle Team. The Rifle team entered competitions using 22 caliber rifles. Morton was known as a crack shot. Edwin Travis who was also on the Rifle Team, remembers Morton as quiet and dignified; and one whom you could always rely on.

Morton married Elise Montgomery.

Morton joined the Pennsylvania National Guard, Company I, 111th Infantry, and “West Chester Own” in 1930. The Company was activated for Active Military Duty in 1940. He trained at various camps in the states; he was stationed at Camp Pendleton, Virginia in October, 1943 where he wrote his will. Morton advanced in rank from private to Commissioned Officer.  He was promoted to First Lieutenant when the Company left West Chester in February, 1941. Morton was promoted to Captain later, then Major in February, 1942.  He was home on furlough in August and October, 1943.

Morton was shipped overseas to the Pacific Theater of operations in December, 1943. His wife received a letter in July informing her he was in the Hawaiian Island area. He was later sent to the Florida Island in the Solomon Island group - just north of Guadalcanal, and where Hero George Johnson died on August 7, 1942.

Major Morton Lackey Talley Died Non-Battle in an aircraft crash on July 26, 1944 in the Solomon Islands. His wife, Elsie was alone with her son when she received the telegram from the War Department on August 8th. She carried the sad news to his parents on the farm.

Morton was buried in a local military cemetery with full honors. IN 1948, he was brought back for burial to his home country. Lieutenant Colonel Arthur J. Jennings of the US Army Quartermaster Center in Philadelphia accompanied the body as guard of honor. Funeral services were held on March 3, 1948.  A military service was conducted by representatives of Company I, the American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars and the Society of the 28th Division. Interment was at the Birmingham Cemetery.  A guard of Honor lined the pathway for the flag draped coffin.  A salute was fired by a squad comprised of members of Company I under First Sergeant Henry A. Tukloff, a friend of Morton. Don Ivins Himes sounded Taps.

Morton was the first World War II casualty from Company I, and the first Army commissioned officer from West Chester to die in the war.

Credits


Research by Don Wambold, WCMSC